The Japan Considered Podcast Archive

June 2008

Weekly programs of analysis and commentary on Japan’s domestic politics and foreign relations. Role of the prime minister and cabinet, changes in Japan's domestic political environment, connecting voters and candidates, constitutional revision, and Japan’s relations with other Asian nations. These broadcasts are created by Japan Considered Project creator/maintainer, Robert Angel, and include short interviews with other specialists on Japanese politics and international relations

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If none of that makes sense, then on the Japan Considered Podcast page [click here] you can read the show notes for each weekly program, and download the audio file to your computer by clicking on the link. The audio files are in compact MP3 format, but still range in size from 8 to 25 meg, so they'll take a while to download.

Beginning with the first show of 2006, I have included a transcript of the whole program for those of you who would rather read than listen.

Thanks for listening, and send comments and suggestions to me via e-mail at RobertCAngel@gmail.com.


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Show Notes

June 27, 2008; Volume 04, Number 21

Click here for the audio file of today's program

Click here for a transcript of this program

Thanks for dropping by again this week. Out in the Mobile Studio again. This time in a new State Park. Have a look at the photos on the transcript. You'll be amazed.

This week has been relatively quiet in Japan's domestic politics and conduct of international relations. But there are a few things we simply can't ignore. Most important is Japan's response to the Bush Administration's decision to de-list North Korea as a state sponsor of terrorism. In return for an overdue "report" on their nuclear activities.

I'd hoped also to look briefly at the efforts of Upper House Member, Ichita Yamamoto, to revise the rules by which an LDP president is elected. Didn't get to it. It will have to wait until the next program.

Which, by the way, is scheduled for July 11th. Friday after next. Since the 4th is a holiday here.

Continue to send your comments and suggestions to me at RobertCAngel@gmail.com

Oh, and have a look at the Google search facility that I've added to the main web page of the Japan Considered Project website, and to the main page of the Podcasts section. Let me know how it works for you. And thanks, Michael, for the suggestion!


June 20, 2008; Volume 04, Number 20

Click here for the audio file of today's program

Click here for a transcript of this program

Welcome back for another edition of the Japan Considered Podcast. This week we complete our consideration of the Upper House Censure Resolution, concluding that it didn't go quite as its sponsors planned. Then we take a very superficial look at the "breakthrough agreement" between Japan and China announced on Wesnesday. The East China Sea issue. Beyond the initial announcement reports, there's been little mention of it on the Japanese side. And finally we look at Takeo Hiranuma. Conservative? Traditionalist? Why does it matter?

Continue to send your comments and suggestions in. They're most helpful. RobertCAngel@gmail.com will do it.


June 13, 2008; Volume 04, Number 19

Click here for the audio file of today's program

Click here for a transcript of this program

Greetings from the Mobile Studio parked at Lake Wateree State Recreation Area. Another opportunity to enjoy South Carolina's beautiful scenery and recreational water. Wish I could send some of it to you. A few photos are included in the transcript, though. So click on over and have a look.

This week we continue our consideration of the DPJ's decision finally to introduce a resolution of censure against Prime Minister Fukuda and his Cabinet in the Upper House. Things have gone pretty much as we expected last week. Not near the effect on Japan's national politics one would expect from reading the Japanese political media over the past year or so.

Then we return to political party system reorganization in Japan. With focus on Lower House Member Takeo Hiranuma's threats to create a new genuinely conservative political party. We didn't get very far beyond analysis of the environment within which this is taking place. Next week we'll focus more specifically on Hiranuma and why his effort may actually matter.

And we close -- nearly on time -- with another clip from the Infamous Stringduster's latest album. A great piece of work.

Thanks for your attention to the Japan Considered Podcast. Please continue to send your comments and suggestions to me directly at RobertCAngel@gmail.com. I read them all, and take each one into consideration when planning new programs. Mail has increased during the past couple of months. That's a good thing. Though I'm considerably behind on responses. Even if you don't receive a direct response, you can be sure I've read your contribution, and appreciate you taking the time and trouble


June 20, 2008; Volume 04, Number 20

Click here for the audio file of today's program

Click here for a transcript of this program

Welcome back for another edition of the Japan Considered Podcast. This week we complete our consideration of the Upper House Censure Resolution, concluding that it didn't go quite as its sponsors planned. Then we take a very superficial look at the "breakthrough agreement" between Japan and China announced on Wesnesday. The East China Sea issue. Beyond the initial announcement reports, there's been little mention of it on the Japanese side. And finally we look at Takeo Hiranuma. Conservative? Traditionalist? Why does it matter?

Continue to send your comments and suggestions in. They're most helpful. RobertCAngel@gmail.com will do it.


June 13, 2008; Volume 04, Number 19

Click here for the audio file of today's program

Click here for a transcript of this program

Greetings from the Mobile Studio parked at Lake Wateree State Recreation Area. Another opportunity to enjoy South Carolina's beautiful scenery and recreational water. Wish I could send some of it to you. A few photos are included in the transcript, though. So click on over and have a look.

This week we continue our consideration of the DPJ's decision finally to introduce a resolution of censure against Prime Minister Fukuda and his Cabinet in the Upper House. Things have gone pretty much as we expected last week. Not near the effect on Japan's national politics one would expect from reading the Japanese political media over the past year or so.

Then we return to political party system reorganization in Japan. With focus on Lower House Member Takeo Hiranuma's threats to create a new genuinely conservative political party. We didn't get very far beyond analysis of the environment within which this is taking place. Next week we'll focus more specifically on Hiranuma and why his effort may actually matter.

And we close -- nearly on time -- with another clip from the Infamous Stringduster's latest album. A great piece of work.

Thanks for your attention to the Japan Considered Podcast. Please continue to send your comments and suggestions to me directly at RobertCAngel@gmail.com. I read them all, and take each one into consideration when planning new programs. Mail has increased during the past couple of months. That's a good thing. Though I'm considerably behind on responses. Even if you don't receive a direct response, you can be sure I've read your contribution, and appreciate you taking the time and trouble


June 6 , 2008; Volume 04, Number 18

Click here for the audio file of today's program

Click here for a transcript of this program

Welcome back for another program. This week we take a close look at the threat of a resolution of censure in Japan's Upper House. What it means; what it doesn't mean. And its effect.

Then we turn to international affairs with review of Japanese media focus last week on China allowing Japan to use SDF military aircraft in their relief efforts for China's earthquake. It didn't happen. But media coverage of the event had significance for Japan-China bilateral relations.

And we close with another clip from the Infamous Stringdusters' latest album, "Well, Well." A real winner.

Please continue to send your comments and suggestions for the program to me at RobertCAngel@gmail.com. I read them all, and take each one into consideration when planning future programs.