The Japan Considered Podcast Archive

May 2008

Weekly programs of analysis and commentary on Japan’s domestic politics and foreign relations. Role of the prime minister and cabinet, changes in Japan's domestic political environment, connecting voters and candidates, constitutional revision, and Japan’s relations with other Asian nations. These broadcasts are created by Japan Considered Project creator/maintainer, Robert Angel, and include short interviews with other specialists on Japanese politics and international relations

You can subscribe by copying the following URL into the "subscribe" window of your podcast aggregator, such as iTunes, Juice, zeibot, or the many others. http://feeds.feedburner.com/JapanConsideredPodcast

Those of you with iTunes already installed on your computers can subscribe with a single click on the iTunes icon, here:   

Or, you can search for "Japan Considered" in the podcast section of the iTunes music store and subscribe from there.

If none of that makes sense, then on the Japan Considered Podcast page [click here] you can read the show notes for each weekly program, and download the audio file to your computer by clicking on the link. The audio files are in compact MP3 format, but still range in size from 8 to 25 meg, so they'll take a while to download.

Beginning with the first show of 2006, I have included a transcript of the whole program for those of you who would rather read than listen.

Thanks for listening, and send comments and suggestions to me via e-mail at RobertCAngel@gmail.com.


Click Here to Return to
Podcast Home Page


Show Notes


May 23, 2008; Volume 04, Number 17

Click here for the audio file of today's program

Click here for a transcript of this program

Thanks for tuning in again this week. Lots of travel and activity on this end. Even though it is summer here! I hope all of you are enjoying this May weather.

This week we wrap up Chinese President Hu Jintao's historic visit to Japan. What was accomplished; what wasn't. And conclude it was an important success for both countries.

Before that, though, we look again at the Space Bill that passed Japan's parliament on Wednesday, and what the bill means for Japan's national security and for its conduct of international relations. Especially in Asia. There's been blessed little coverage of this bill in the English language press. Probably because it's summer. But it really is quite important.

And finally, we take a preliminary look at Japan's response to China's earthquake disaster in Sichuan Province on May 12th. The bilateral atmospherics appear to have been positive, and that's important. Next time we'll consider the strange events surrounding news that China had asked Japan to use SDF military planes in the relief effort. And what happened to that.

This week I have a clip of bluegrass from the "Infamous Stringdusters" that just can't wait. A clip from their latest, second, album. So, enjoy.


 


May 9 , 2008; Volume 04, Number 16

Click here for the audio file of today's program

Click here for a transcript of this program

Thanks for dropping in again today, to you long-time listeners. And welcome to those of you who have just found the program. I hope it meets your expectations. Send your comments and suggestions to me at RobertCAngel@gmail.com. I read them all, and appreciate each one. You don't have to agree with my analysis to have your comments read and taken seriously.

This week we focus on a preliminary look at the historic visit of Chinese President Hu Jintao to Japan. He's still there, so everything has to be preliminary. But I've got plenty of information about the trip, and preparations of the trip, to consider with you.

Also, we consider the significance of legislation going through Japan's parliament this week that modifies the rules under which Japan's extensive space program operates. The international media hasn't paid much attention to this. And to me it seems potentially significant.