The Japan Considered Podcast Archive
December 2007

Weekly programs of analysis and commentary on Japan’s domestic politics and foreign relations. Role of the prime minister and cabinet, changes in Japan's domestic political environment, connecting voters and candidates, constitutional revision, and Japan’s relations with other Asian nations. These broadcasts are created by Japan Considered Project creator/maintainer, Robert Angel, and include short interviews with other specialists on Japanese politics and international relations

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If none of that makes sense, then on the Japan Considered Podcast page [click here] you can read the show notes for each weekly program, and download the audio file to your computer by clicking on the link. The audio files are in compact MP3 format, but still range in size from 8 to 25 meg, so they'll take a while to download.

Beginning with the first show of 2006, I have included a transcript of the whole program for those of you who would rather read than listen.

Thanks for listening, and send comments and suggestions to me via e-mail at RobertCAngel@gmail.com.


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Show Notes

December 21, 2007; Volume 03, Number 44

Click here for the audio file for today's program

Click here for a transcript of this program

Welcome back to the Japan Considered Podcast. Thanks for dropping by. The production schedule is still muddled. But the Podcast is going strong. No PodFading here.

This week we consider a number of international events of significance. First a follow-up on the "Joint Communique" flap with Mainland China we discussed on the last program. Then preparations for Prime Minister Fukuda's first trip to China as prime minister. Next we consider the longer-term significance of Japan's successful SM-3 missile shoot-down from the Aegis-equipped Kongou destroyer. And finally, on the international side, how the Fukuda Cabinet has handled the DSP inquiry into Government of Japan preparations for the arrival of potentially hostile UFOs.

In conclusion we take a look at the LDP's new YouTube website, and consider its significance for political campaigning in Japan.

As always, send your comments and suggestions for the program directly to me at RobertCAngel@gmail.com. I read them all, and respond directly to as many as possible soon after their arrival. End-of-semester flurry has created a back-up there too, I fear. But I'll get through them all, and appreciate the suggestions.


December 11, 2007; Volume 03, Number 43

Click here for the audio file for today's program

Click here for a transcript of this program

Yes, that's right. Tuesday, December 11th. Delayed again by the day job!

This week we take a closer look at one international and one domestic political issue. Both seem to have longer-term significance for our understanding of just how Japan works.

First, we consider the sudden eruption of a flap over Beijing editing the published Chinese version of a "Joint Communique" issued at the end of the cabinet-level bilateral economic talks in Beijing held earlier this month.

Then we consider recent domestic political developments, with focus on debate over extension of the current Diet session. Looking at both ruling coalition and opposition actions and motivations, as well as the longer-term significance of all this.

As always, continue to send your comments and suggestions for the program directly to me at RobertCAngel@gmail.com. I read them all, and respond directly to as many as possible. They're a big help when planning future programs.