The Japan Considered Podcast Archive
June 2007

Weekly programs of analysis and commentary on Japan’s domestic politics and foreign relations. Role of the prime minister and cabinet, changes in Japan's domestic political environment, connecting voters and candidates, constitutional revision, and Japan’s relations with other Asian nations. These broadcasts are created by Japan Considered Project creator/maintainer, Robert Angel, and include short interviews with other specialists on Japanese politics and international relations

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If none of that makes sense, then on the Japan Considered Podcast page [click here] you can read the show notes for each weekly program, and download the audio file to your computer by clicking on the link. The audio files are in compact MP3 format, but still range in size from 8 to 25 meg, so they'll take a while to download.

Beginning with the first show of 2006, I have included a transcript of the whole program for those of you who would rather read than listen.

Thanks for listening, and send comments and suggestions to me via e-mail at RobertCAngel@gmail.com.


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Show Notes


June 22, 2007. Volume 03, Number 23

Click here for the audio file of this program.

Click here for a transcript of this program.

Welcome again to the Japan Considered Podcast. Each week at this time we consider items in the news with longer-term significance for understanding Japan's domestic politics and conduct of international relations. Click on over to the Japan Considered Project Website at www.JapanConsidered.com. There you'll find a number of links to some of the best English language information on political and international Japan available free of charge on the Web. You'll also find a number of interviews with individuals who've made important contributions to the English language literature on Japan.

This week our focus is almost entirely domestic. After brief mention of the flurry of activity related to the North Korean nuclear issue, and Secretary Hill's visit to Pyongyang.

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has forced an extension of the current Diet session. A 12-day extension. That will change the date of the Upper House election next month. So, it's important. We consider the significance of this change. And the significance of Prime Minister Abe's role in the decision.

As always, send your comments and suggestions to me at RobertCAngel@gmail.com. I read them all, respond directly to as many as time permits, and consider all when preparing future programs.


June 15, 2007. Volume 03, Number 22

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Click here for a transcript of this program.

Thanks for dropping by again for another Japan Considered Podcast. Each week at this time we consider events of longer-term significance in the news from Japan. Those with the potential for telling us more about how Japan's domestic politics and conduct of international relations actually works.

This week we focus on the upcoming Upper House election. Its timing, how the election is conducted, and the likely effect on Japan's domestic politics should the Ruling Coalition lose its Upper House majority. That's not a prediction, now. Just a "what-if" sort of exercise.

Please continue to send your comments and suggestions to me at RobertCAngel@gmail.com. I read them all and take each one into consideration when planning future programs.


June 8, 2007. Volume 03; Number 21

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Click here for a transcript of this program.

A hearty South Carolina welcome to one and all. Thanks for dropping by this week. Special welcome to those of you who haven't been with us before. I hope the program meets your expectations.

Each week we consider events in the news from Japan with longer-term significance for Japan's domestic politics and/or conduct of international relations. Not a news show, now. Nothing that fancy. Or comprehensive. Just interpretation and analysis of what others tell us.

This week our focus is international. First, the significance of creation of an annual 2+2 diplo-military consultation framework with Australia, and the first annual meeting.

Then we take what must be a preliminary look at Japan's participation in the G-8 Summit being held in Germany. How does Prime Minister Abe's performance compare with those of his predecessors.

Click on over too the G-8 Summit website maintained by the G-8 Research Group at Trinity College. The University of Toronto hosts the website. Here's the link. Well worth saving.

And finally we break tradition and conclude with a non-bluegrass clip today. It's close, though. Hope you like it.


Friday, June 01, 2007

June 1, 2007. Volume 03; Number 20

Click here for the audio file of this program.

Click here for a transcript of this program.

Thanks for dropping by again to the Japan Considered Podcast. Each week at this time we consider recent events in the news with longer-term significance for Japan's domestic politics and conduct of international relations. The mobile studio is home this week, making production just a little easier. Hopefully, improving the quality of the sound.

Another busy week in Japan. We begin the program with an interview with Dr. James Auer, Director of the Center for U.S.-Japan Studies and Cooperation at Vanderbilt University. A number of you asked for more information about the current debate over collective security, and Jim provides that. Great information and analysis from one of best on this subject. See a copy of Jim's interview on the Japan Considered Project Interviews page by clicking here.

Then we turn to the unfortunate death on Monday of Agriculture Minister, Toshikatsu Matsuoka. Japan's political news has been full of articles on this subject. Most of them focused on the effect of Matsuoka's suicide on the Abe Cabinet and next month's Upper House election. While all that is undoubtedly important, I think there is broader, longer-term significance of Matsuoka's death that we should consider. So we do!

Finally, we have that bluegrass clip I promised you last week. From The Man, John Duffey. Hope you enjoy it. If you don't yet have your own copy off "Always in Style," click here to go over to the Country Sales site to buy one. Or, it's also available for download from iTunes. Just enter "Always in Style" in the search window, or even "John Duffey." Though I warn you, results from the latter search string may cost you more than you expected to spend!