The Japan Considered Podcast Archive
September 2006

Weekly programs of analysis and commentary on Japan’s domestic politics and foreign relations. Role of the prime minister and cabinet, changes in Japan's domestic political environment, connecting voters and candidates, constitutional revision, and Japan’s relations with other Asian nations. These broadcasts are created by Japan Considered Project creator/maintainer, Robert Angel, and include short interviews with other specialists on Japanese politics and international relations

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If none of that makes sense, then on the Japan Considered Podcast page [click here] you can read the show notes for each weekly program, and download the audio file to your computer by clicking on the link. The audio files are in compact MP3 format, but still range in size from 8 to 25 meg, so they'll take a while to download.

Beginning with the first show of 2006, I have included a transcript of the whole program for those of you who would rather read than listen.

Thanks for listening, and send comments and suggestions to me via e-mail at RobertCAngel@gmail.com.


Show Notes


September 22, 2006. Volume 02, Number 35.

Click here for the audio file for this program.

Click here for a transcript of this program.

Welcome again to the program. Thanks for tuning in. This week, after updating handling of the unfortunate Kisshin-Maru 31 fishing boat incident with Russia, we take a closer look at the election of Shinzo Abe as president of the Liberal Democratic Party. How it happened, what it's likely to mean, and consider the nature of communications media reporting on the result.

Then we turn again to the Democratic Party of Japan. Last week we considered the DPJ's overall importance for the Japanese political party system, and its leadership. This week we consider the organization of the DPJ, with comments from Professor Len Schoppa of the University of Virginia. Visit Professor Schoppa's website, Japan Politics Central, by clicking here.


September 15, 2006. Volume 02, Number 34.

Click here for the audio file for this program.

Click here for a transcript of this program.

Thanks for tuning in again to the Japan Considered Podcast. This week we consider three events of significance in Japan's foreign relations:


Following that we begin the first of a three-part series on the Japan Democratic Party. This week we consider DPJ leadership, with a focus on DPJ President, Ichiro Ozawa. Professor Len Schoppa joins us briefly via SkypePhone to add his comments.

We close with a short clip from Tony Rice's "Sweet Sunny South" from Rounder Records.

Visit the Japan Considered website at www.JapanConsidered.com for a transcript of this program, and links to other English language information on Japan's domestic politics and international relations.


September 08, 2006. Volume 02, Number 33.

Click here for the audio file for this program.

Click here for a transcript of this program.

Welcome again to the Japan Considered Podcast. I'm Robert Angel, creator and host of the Podcast. Click through the Japan Considered website at www.JapanConsidered.com for more English language information on Japan's domestic politics and international relations.

This week we consider the political significance of the birth of Japan's newest Prince. Then we look again at the last days of the Koizumi premiership, and speculate on his role after leaving the Kantei.

Finally, in response to a large number of comments and questions via e-mail this week about my Factionist-Populist concept, I offer some clarification.

Please continue to send your comments and suggestions to me at RobertCAngel@gmail.com. I enjoy reading them, and take each one into consideration when planning subsequent programs.