The Japan Considered Podcast Archive
March 2006

Weekly programs of analysis and commentary on Japan’s domestic politics and foreign relations. Role of the prime minister and cabinet, changes in Japan's domestic political environment, connecting voters and candidates, constitutional revision, and Japan’s relations with other Asian nations. These broadcasts are created by Japan Considered Project creator/maintainer, Robert Angel, and include short interviews with other specialists on Japanese politics and international relations

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If none of that makes sense, then in the space below you can read the show notes for each weekly program, and download the audio file to your computer by clicking on the link. The audio files are in compact MP3 format, but still range in size from 8 to 25 meg, so they'll take a while to download.

Beginning with the first show of 2006, I have included a transcript of the whole program for those of you who would rather read than listen.

Thanks for listening, and send comments and suggestions to me via e-mail at JapanConsidered@gmail.com.


Show Notes


March 31, 2006. Volume 02, Number 13

Click here for the audio file of today's program.

Click here for the transcript of today's program.

Thanks for tuning in again this week. Our subscriptions numbers still are climbing steadily. But many more of you are downloading the audio file and/or the transcripts directly. That's unusual for a podcast. But, I guess, the result is the same. Glad to have you listening. Please continue to send your comments and suggestions to me at JapanConsidered@gmail.com. I'm looking into adding a resource that will allow you to submit short audio comments as mp3 files. But that will take a while.

This week's events tended to pile up toward the end of the week. With important developments today, in fact. We consider first the background of Seiji Maehara's resignation today from the DPJ presidency, and its implications for national politics in Japan. Then we look at positive and less positive developments in Japan's relationship with China. And finally we consider the current legislative agenda. I'd hoped to cover recent developments in the relationship with North Korea, but that will have to wait.

Last week I ran across a podcast that those of you studying Japanese language should find useful. It is called Japanesepod101. You can find it by searching on iTunes, or through a Google search. Here is their website, which, I understand, is about to go through major revisions. A group of four language specialists produce a daily program. Quite an accomplishment.

Japanesepod101

National Institute for Defense Studies

Rounder Records


March 24, 2006. Volume 02, Number 12


Click here for the audio file of today's program.

Click here for the transcript of today's program.

Thanks for dropping by again this week. Send your comments and suggestions for the program to me at japanconsidered@gmail.com.

And check this website for additional information related to Japan's domestic politics and international relations. I have added an interview with Professor John Campbell of the University of Michigan to the Interviews page. That makes a total of thirteen interviews, so far. John also has contributed an Occasional Paper to the collection.

This week we complete our consideration of the race to succeed Junichiro Koizumi as president of the Liberal Democratic Party, and prime minister. I describe how two groups, that I call the "Factionists" and the "Populists," are pursuing their agendas through the LDP presidential succession race, and then consider the significance of this for Japan's domestic politics and international relations.

Next week we will return to the regular program format, with commentary and analysis that focuses on three or four events of importance from the past week's news.

Here are links to individuals and organizations mentioned during today's program:

Liberal Democratic Party

Japan Considered Project

Rounder Records


March 17, 2006. Volume 02, No. 11

Click here for the audio file of today's program.

Click here for a transcript of today's program.

Welcome back for another week of the Japan Considered Podcast. Thanks again for subscribing, or for downloading the audio file. E-mail your suggestions and comments to me at japanconsidered@gmail.com.

This week we begin with response to a listener's question. Why all the coverage of the Democratic Party of Japan when they appear to be going nowhere.

After discussion of what we can learn from observing the DPJ, we shift to the first part of a two-week consideration of the race within the LDP to succeed Junichiro Koizumi as Party President. This includes profiles of the two leading candidates, and review of the April 2001 election that put Koizumi into office.

We conclude with a short clip from "Big Spike Hammer" from Volume Three of the Bluegrass Album: California Connection. You can order a copy of the CD from Rounder Records at the link below.

Some Links to individuals and organizations mentioned this week:

The Democratic Party of Japan

The Liberal Democratic Party

Shinzo Abe

Yasuo Fukuda

Yasuhiro Nakasone

Rounder Records


March 10, 2006. Volume 02, No. 10

Click here for the audio file of today's program.

Click here for a transcript of today's program.

Welcome again to the Japan Considered Podcast. This week we begin with Japan's reaction to the Chinese counterproposal on gas exploration in the East China Sea. Then we consider the significance of the Democratic Party of Japan's leadership problems, and interesting recent developments.

We close with a web audio tour of the resources offered on Japan Media Review site at the University of Southern California.

Here are a few links to individuals and organizations mentioned during today's podcast:

People's Republic of China Ministry of Foreign Affairs

Japan's Ministry of Foreign Affairs

The Democratic Party of Japan

The Japan Considered Project

Sugar Hill Records


March 03, 2006. Volume 02, No. 09

Click here for the audio file of today's program.

Click here for a transcript of today's program.

Thanks for tuning in again this week. Note the "archive" section on the left-hand side of this page. With this we can limit the show notes on this page to only the last few weeks, making the page load much more quickly. Earlier shows will be available in the archives section.

This week we begin with three important international items. First, Japan's reaction to comments made earlier in the week by South Korean President Roh concerning revision of Japan's Constitution.

Then we consider preparations for official bilateral negotiations with China over the East China Sea boundary dispute, and its signifiance.

Japan hosted Iran's Foreign Minister, Manouchehr Mottaki, this week, hoping to mediate the dispute between Iran and much of the rest of the world over enrichment of uranium.

Finally, we return to the Nagata e-mail flap and consider its significance for the politics of the remainder of the current Diet session, and then its potential significance for national political leadership in Japan.

The closing bars of bluegrass are worth waiting for: Tony Rice singing "There's Nothin' Like a Hundred Miles" on his 1992 Rounder album, Native American.

Here are a few links to individuals and organizations mentioned during today's program:

Republic of South Korea, Office of the President

United Nations, Oceans and the Law of the Sea

Iran's Ministry of Foreign Affairs

Rounder Records

The Japan Considered Project